Archives de Tag: Canadians and their pasts

April 2015 / Conference in London

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of BACS we have issued an open call for papers for the April 2015 conference. Individual papers (20 minutes maximum) and panels of 2, 3 or 4 papers (90 minutes maximum) are invited on any aspect of Canadian Studies including Canadian history, politics, international relations, literature, film, art, society, etc. Proposals for entire panels and/or papers with an anniversary theme will be especially welcome.

Outline proposals (250-500 words per paper plus brief c.v. or c.vs) should be submitted by Friday 30 January 2015 to Dr Luke Flanagan lukeflanagan@btinternet.com and/or Dr Tony McCulloch tony.mcculloch@ucl.ac.uk

Paper proposals will normally be reviewed and answered within 48 hours in order to expedite conference planning and registration

Confirmed speakers are:

Payam Akhavan on ‘Canada and Human Rights at Home and Abroad’

Guy LaForest on ‘The Quebec Conference – 150 Years Later’

Gillian Roberts on ‘Diverging Parallels: Canadian Literature and the Canada-US Border’

Jocelyn Létourneau on ‘Canadians and their Past’

Prizes for the best conference papers presented by an early career researcher, a doctoral student and a Masters or undergraduate student will be awarded at the conference dinner.

REGISTRATION NOW.

In bookstore now: Canadians and Their Pasts

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What role does history play in contemporary society? Has the frenetic pace of today’s world led people to lose contact with the past? A high-profile team of researchers from across Canada sought to answer these questions by launching an ambitious investigation into how Canadians engage with history in their everyday lives. The results of their survey form the basis of this eye-opening book.

Canadians and Their Pasts reports on the findings of interviews with 3,419 Canadians from a variety of cultural and linguistic communities. Along with yielding rich qualitative data, the surveys generated revealing quantitative data that allows for comparisons based on gender, ethnicity, migration histories, region, age, income, and educational background. The book also brings Canada into international conversation with similar studies undertaken earlier in the United States, Australia, and Europe.

Canadians and Their Pasts confirms that, for most Canadians, the past is not dead. Rather, it reveals that our histories continue to shape the present in many powerful ways.

No. 6 on Amazon Hot New Releases: http://www.amazon.ca/gp/new-releases/books/928502

At University of Toronto Press: http://www.utppublishing.com/Canadians-and-Their-Pasts.html

Follow Canadians and Their Pasts on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pastscollective

Official website: http://www.canadiansandtheirpasts.ca/

Authors

Margaret Conrad is a emerita professor in the Department of History at the University of New Brunswick.

Kadriye Ercikan is a professor of Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology in the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia.

Gerald Friesen is Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Manitoba.

Jocelyn Létourneau is Canada Research Chair in the History and Political Economy of Contemporary Quebec and a professor in the Department of History at l’Université Laval.

Delphin Muise is an emeritus professor in the Department of History at Carleton University.

David Northrup is associate director of the Institute for Social Research at York University.

Peter Seixas is Canada Research Chair in Historical Consciousness and a professor in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy at the University of British Columbia.

 

Introductions

« Introductions : Measuring History / Quantifier l’histoire« , Canadian Journal for Social Research/Revue canadienne de recherche sociale, 4, 1 (2011), p. 2-5.

Dans un monde connu pour la rapidité de ses changements où tout se défait et se refait dans le temps de le dire, l’histoire reste bon gré mal gré une référence cardinale au présent et le rapport au passé demeure un lien valorisé par les contemporains, qu’ils soient jeunes ou vieux, hommes ou femmes, très instruits ou peu scolarisés, cossus ou désargentés, d’ici ou d’ailleurs.

Au cours des dernières années, l’importance accordée au passé a été démontrée de bien des façons, d’abord aux États-Unis et en Australie, puis au Canada par la suite. S’appuyant sur une longue enquête menée à travers tout le pays entre mars 2007 et avril 2008 (n = 3,119), le projet Les Canadiens et leurs passés a permis de faire état de la présence du passé dans la vie quotidienne des gens ordinaires. Dans l’article qu’il publie ici, David Northrup met en relief l’intérêt et l’importance qu’accordent les Canadiens au passé, et plus particulièrement au passé familial. À travers son étude, il devient évident que le fait de s’inscrire dans une continuité, celle de la famille en l’occurence, est une nécessité humaine que la condition hypermoderne n’a pas abolie.

[…]

English version:

In a modern world defined by incessant change, history remains a constant in our lives, and the relationship that binds us to a past is a connection that is highly valued by all individuals, young and old, male and female, wealthy or poor, highly educated or not, born here or elsewhere.

In recent years, the importance that individuals attach to the past has been demonstrated in a number of studies conducted first in the United-States and Australia, and then in Canada. Based on an extensive research undertaken throughout the whole country between March 2007 and April 2008 (n=3, 119), the project Canadians and Their Past gives an account of the presence of the past in the daily lives of ordinary people. In his article, David Northrup exposes the importance and the interest that Canadians give to their past, and more particularly, to their family history. Throughout his research, it becomes clear that being able to insert one’s life story into a chronology, especially a family storyline, is a human need that has not been destroyed by our hypermodern world.

[…]

Nouveau livre disponible en décembre

canadians and theirs pasts jocelyn létourneau

Canadians and Their Pasts

By Margaret Conrad, Kadriye Ercikan, Gerald Friesen, Jocelyn Létourneau, Delphin Muise, David Northrup, and Peter Seixas
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division © 2013
World Rights
240 Pages

What role does history play in contemporary society? Has the frenetic pace of today’s world led people to lose contact with the past? A high-profile team of researchers from across Canada sought to answer these questions by launching an ambitious investigation into how Canadians engage with history in their everyday lives. The results of their survey form the basis of this eye-opening book.

Canadians and Their Pasts reports on the findings of interviews with 3,419 Canadians from a variety of cultural and linguistic communities. Along with yielding rich qualitative data, the surveys generated revealing quantitative data that allows for comparisons based on gender, ethnicity, migration histories, region, age, income, and educational background. The book also brings Canada into international conversation with similar studies undertaken earlier in the United States, Australia, and Europe.

Canadians and Their Pasts confirms that, for most Canadians, the past is not dead. Rather, it reveals that our histories continue to shape the present in many powerful ways.

Le passé et nous : conférences en ligne

Les conférences du colloque « Le passé et nous: De la conscience historique au XXIe siècle/The past around us: Historical Consciousness in the XXIst Century » sont maintenant en ligne : voir l’album

Colloque international

Le passé et nous. De la conscience historique au XXIe siècle
The Past around Us. Historical Consciousness in the XXIst Century

Colloque international, Québec, 29 septembre – 1er octobre 2011
Auditorium, ÉNAP

Avec Paul Ashton, Patrick Garcia, Sam Wineburg, Paula Hamilton, Henry Rousso, Allan Megill, Pilvi Torsti, Laurajane Smith, Michel Côté et plusieurs autres…

Affiche (pdf)
Programme final