Archives de Tag: Historical consciousness

TUE, 1 DEC 2015 AT 17:30 /// Young People, National Narratives and History Education /// Committee Room 1, UCL Institute of Education (IOE), London, United Kingdom

When entering school, kids are not empty pots. They know many things, including things about the past of their society. Getting into the body of this historical knowledge is an interesting business. It reveals to what extent assimilated family souvenirs and community memories and templates are important in shaping children’s historical knowledge and historical consciousness.

If family souvenirs and community memories are structural components in kid’s historical consciousness, they also represent limitations to take students out of the mythistories – a mix of brute facts and historical romance – they’re trapped in when telling the past. One of the main challenges to teaching the past to kids is to get them outside the thinkable they’ve been accustomed to in living in a particular society and being subjected to its broad representations.

The aim of the talk is to discuss a pragmatic approach to teaching the past to kids in the context of a strong presence of community memories and templates everywhere in society, assuming the fact that kids learn history in and out of the classroom. The proposed approach – to start from memory in order to get out of it – comes from an innovative study effectuated in Quebec in the last decade (www.tonhistoireduquebec.ca) which consisted in collecting short narratives (N = 5000) and phrases (N= 3423) produced by students responding to two basic questions: 1) “Tell me the story of Quebec as you know it;” 2) “If you had to summarize in one sentence the historical experience of Quebec, what would you write personally?”

Young People, National Narratives and History Education What young people do and do not know about the past is frequently discussed in news media and in political debate. Young people are typically presented as having a knowledge deficit in these discussions and it has become almost a truism to claim that the young know little or nothing about history. This seminar will explore what young people know about the past and the sources of their knowledge from an international perspective. Drawing on research from Quebec, Ottawa and Amsterdam, the seminar will reflect on the nature, form and sources of young people's thinking about the past and aim to challenge the clichéd practice of itemising and lamenting 'the ignorance of the young'.

Young People, National Narratives and History Education
What young people do and do not know about the past is frequently discussed in news media and in political debate. Young people are typically presented as having a knowledge deficit in these discussions and it has become almost a truism to claim that the young know little or nothing about history.
This seminar will explore what young people know about the past and the sources of their knowledge from an international perspective. Drawing on research from Quebec, Ottawa and Amsterdam, the seminar will reflect on the nature, form and sources of young people’s thinking about the past and aim to challenge the clichéd practice of itemising and lamenting ‘the ignorance of the young’.

An austalian project

Inaugural Issue of Historical Encounters: A Journal of Historical Consciousness, Historical Cultures, and History Education

Penney Clark, THEN/HiER Director, and Jocelyn Létourneau, Stéphane Lévesque, Ruth Sandwell, and Peter Seixas, THEN/HiER Executive Board members, are Editorial Board members for Historical Encounters: A Journal of Historical Consciousness, Historical Cultures, and History Education. The inaugural issue of this peer-reviewed open access journal based at the University of Newcastle, Australia, is available online.

Source.

In bookstore now: Canadians and Their Pasts

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What role does history play in contemporary society? Has the frenetic pace of today’s world led people to lose contact with the past? A high-profile team of researchers from across Canada sought to answer these questions by launching an ambitious investigation into how Canadians engage with history in their everyday lives. The results of their survey form the basis of this eye-opening book.

Canadians and Their Pasts reports on the findings of interviews with 3,419 Canadians from a variety of cultural and linguistic communities. Along with yielding rich qualitative data, the surveys generated revealing quantitative data that allows for comparisons based on gender, ethnicity, migration histories, region, age, income, and educational background. The book also brings Canada into international conversation with similar studies undertaken earlier in the United States, Australia, and Europe.

Canadians and Their Pasts confirms that, for most Canadians, the past is not dead. Rather, it reveals that our histories continue to shape the present in many powerful ways.

No. 6 on Amazon Hot New Releases: http://www.amazon.ca/gp/new-releases/books/928502

At University of Toronto Press: http://www.utppublishing.com/Canadians-and-Their-Pasts.html

Follow Canadians and Their Pasts on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pastscollective

Official website: http://www.canadiansandtheirpasts.ca/

Authors

Margaret Conrad is a emerita professor in the Department of History at the University of New Brunswick.

Kadriye Ercikan is a professor of Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology in the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia.

Gerald Friesen is Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Manitoba.

Jocelyn Létourneau is Canada Research Chair in the History and Political Economy of Contemporary Quebec and a professor in the Department of History at l’Université Laval.

Delphin Muise is an emeritus professor in the Department of History at Carleton University.

David Northrup is associate director of the Institute for Social Research at York University.

Peter Seixas is Canada Research Chair in Historical Consciousness and a professor in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy at the University of British Columbia.

 

Introductions

« Introductions : Measuring History / Quantifier l’histoire« , Canadian Journal for Social Research/Revue canadienne de recherche sociale, 4, 1 (2011), p. 2-5.

Dans un monde connu pour la rapidité de ses changements où tout se défait et se refait dans le temps de le dire, l’histoire reste bon gré mal gré une référence cardinale au présent et le rapport au passé demeure un lien valorisé par les contemporains, qu’ils soient jeunes ou vieux, hommes ou femmes, très instruits ou peu scolarisés, cossus ou désargentés, d’ici ou d’ailleurs.

Au cours des dernières années, l’importance accordée au passé a été démontrée de bien des façons, d’abord aux États-Unis et en Australie, puis au Canada par la suite. S’appuyant sur une longue enquête menée à travers tout le pays entre mars 2007 et avril 2008 (n = 3,119), le projet Les Canadiens et leurs passés a permis de faire état de la présence du passé dans la vie quotidienne des gens ordinaires. Dans l’article qu’il publie ici, David Northrup met en relief l’intérêt et l’importance qu’accordent les Canadiens au passé, et plus particulièrement au passé familial. À travers son étude, il devient évident que le fait de s’inscrire dans une continuité, celle de la famille en l’occurence, est une nécessité humaine que la condition hypermoderne n’a pas abolie.

[…]

English version:

In a modern world defined by incessant change, history remains a constant in our lives, and the relationship that binds us to a past is a connection that is highly valued by all individuals, young and old, male and female, wealthy or poor, highly educated or not, born here or elsewhere.

In recent years, the importance that individuals attach to the past has been demonstrated in a number of studies conducted first in the United-States and Australia, and then in Canada. Based on an extensive research undertaken throughout the whole country between March 2007 and April 2008 (n=3, 119), the project Canadians and Their Past gives an account of the presence of the past in the daily lives of ordinary people. In his article, David Northrup exposes the importance and the interest that Canadians give to their past, and more particularly, to their family history. Throughout his research, it becomes clear that being able to insert one’s life story into a chronology, especially a family storyline, is a human need that has not been destroyed by our hypermodern world.

[…]

Capturing the Historical Consciousness of Young People

I can’t boast that I’ve had many good ideas in my life. I can only think of five: my four children (ideas shared and achieved with my wife!) and then another (let’s hope it’s not the last!), that arrived late, but which I’ve been excited about since I managed to solidify it in the form of a research project.

I have always been fascinated by young people – by their intelligence, curiosity, and thirst for knowledge. I have always been disconcerted by those who claim, to the contrary, that young people don’t know much. The fact is that young people know a lot of things, but we don’t always know the best way to elicit what they know. For example, can we conclude that, since 95% of young people in Québec don’t know who the first premier of the province was, that their knowledge is deficient? We can’t, but we do anyway!

In order to counter such a simplistic methodology and interpretation, I told myself that, to get at the wealth of knowledge that young people in Québec have about their province’s history in a less superficial fashion, and to directly access their historical memory of Québec, it would be interesting to ask them a broader question, which was in this case: “Tell me the history of Québec as you know it, from the beginning.”

jocelyn létourneau survey historical consciousness québec history

Over the past ten years, with the support of many teachers and professors, I gathered close to five thousand short historical accounts from young people aged from about 15 to 25 years old, from all over the province. The corpus is as massive as it is rich, consisting of texts written by young francophones, anglophones, allophones and aboriginals. […]

For the rest of the text, follow this link…

Young Quebecers’ Historical Consciousness