Archives de Tag: Identity

TUE, 1 DEC 2015 AT 17:30 /// Young People, National Narratives and History Education /// Committee Room 1, UCL Institute of Education (IOE), London, United Kingdom

When entering school, kids are not empty pots. They know many things, including things about the past of their society. Getting into the body of this historical knowledge is an interesting business. It reveals to what extent assimilated family souvenirs and community memories and templates are important in shaping children’s historical knowledge and historical consciousness.

If family souvenirs and community memories are structural components in kid’s historical consciousness, they also represent limitations to take students out of the mythistories – a mix of brute facts and historical romance – they’re trapped in when telling the past. One of the main challenges to teaching the past to kids is to get them outside the thinkable they’ve been accustomed to in living in a particular society and being subjected to its broad representations.

The aim of the talk is to discuss a pragmatic approach to teaching the past to kids in the context of a strong presence of community memories and templates everywhere in society, assuming the fact that kids learn history in and out of the classroom. The proposed approach – to start from memory in order to get out of it – comes from an innovative study effectuated in Quebec in the last decade (www.tonhistoireduquebec.ca) which consisted in collecting short narratives (N = 5000) and phrases (N= 3423) produced by students responding to two basic questions: 1) “Tell me the story of Quebec as you know it;” 2) “If you had to summarize in one sentence the historical experience of Quebec, what would you write personally?”

Young People, National Narratives and History Education What young people do and do not know about the past is frequently discussed in news media and in political debate. Young people are typically presented as having a knowledge deficit in these discussions and it has become almost a truism to claim that the young know little or nothing about history. This seminar will explore what young people know about the past and the sources of their knowledge from an international perspective. Drawing on research from Quebec, Ottawa and Amsterdam, the seminar will reflect on the nature, form and sources of young people's thinking about the past and aim to challenge the clichéd practice of itemising and lamenting 'the ignorance of the young'.

Young People, National Narratives and History Education
What young people do and do not know about the past is frequently discussed in news media and in political debate. Young people are typically presented as having a knowledge deficit in these discussions and it has become almost a truism to claim that the young know little or nothing about history.
This seminar will explore what young people know about the past and the sources of their knowledge from an international perspective. Drawing on research from Quebec, Ottawa and Amsterdam, the seminar will reflect on the nature, form and sources of young people’s thinking about the past and aim to challenge the clichéd practice of itemising and lamenting ‘the ignorance of the young’.

International Conference @ Prague, October 10th

Click on the image to access the International conference program / School X Memory: Conflict, identity, coexistence (Central Europe), Prague, 10-11 October 2014.

School X Memory: Conflict, identity, coexistence (Central Europe), Prague, 10-11 October 2014 / Click on the image to access the program

Click on the image to access the abstract of Jocelyn Létourneau's talk: Start from Memory to Get over it. A Pragmatic Approach to Teaching History to Kids

 Jocelyn Létourneau’s talk: Start from Memory to Get over it. A Pragmatic Approach to Teaching History to Kids / Click on the image to access the abstract

School vs. Memory?

School vs. Memory?
Conflict, Identity, Coexistence (Central Europe)
International interdisciplinary conference | Prague, 10–11 October 2014

PANEL 2 – SCHOOL – Theory and research

Chair : Patrick Hutton

Keynote Speaker: Felicitas Macgilchrist

Contributors

  • Raffaele Mantegazza (Università Milano-Bicocca)
  • Gitanjali Pyndiah (Goldsmiths University of London)
  • Maria Georgiou (Institute of Education, University of London)
  • Jocelyn Létourneau (Université Laval)
  • Marcel Tomasek (Historical Sociology, Faculty of  Humanities, Charles University)

Discussion 

Complete program.

Létourneau’s talk : Start from memory to get over it. A pragmatic approach to teaching history to kids.

See also :

Capturing the Historical Consciousness of Young People

I can’t boast that I’ve had many good ideas in my life. I can only think of five: my four children (ideas shared and achieved with my wife!) and then another (let’s hope it’s not the last!), that arrived late, but which I’ve been excited about since I managed to solidify it in the form of a research project.

I have always been fascinated by young people – by their intelligence, curiosity, and thirst for knowledge. I have always been disconcerted by those who claim, to the contrary, that young people don’t know much. The fact is that young people know a lot of things, but we don’t always know the best way to elicit what they know. For example, can we conclude that, since 95% of young people in Québec don’t know who the first premier of the province was, that their knowledge is deficient? We can’t, but we do anyway!

In order to counter such a simplistic methodology and interpretation, I told myself that, to get at the wealth of knowledge that young people in Québec have about their province’s history in a less superficial fashion, and to directly access their historical memory of Québec, it would be interesting to ask them a broader question, which was in this case: “Tell me the history of Québec as you know it, from the beginning.”

jocelyn létourneau survey historical consciousness québec history

Over the past ten years, with the support of many teachers and professors, I gathered close to five thousand short historical accounts from young people aged from about 15 to 25 years old, from all over the province. The corpus is as massive as it is rich, consisting of texts written by young francophones, anglophones, allophones and aboriginals. […]

For the rest of the text, follow this link…

History under Harper: Federal identity initiatives in Conservative Canada

jocelyn létourneau table ronde

Participation à une table ronde le mercredi 5 juin à l’Université de Victoria en Colombie-Britannique, dans le cadre du Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

In this open roundtable session, several historians and political scientists discuss in “micro-lecture” format how history and historical events have been marshaled in service of Canadian identity in the Harper years. Examples of the Harper government’s recent historical initiatives include the War of 1812 commemorations, a new stress on military history and attempts to reawaken a sense of Canada’s British connection. At the same time, the Conservatives have recognized historical injustices committed in Canada, as seen, for instance, with the Community Historical Recognition Program and the official apologies for the Chinese head tax and residential schools policies. Do these various foci stand in tension with one another, or are they complementary? Join us in this engaging discussion about the changing contemporary character of Canadian politics, identity and citizenship.

Participants include Yasmeen Abu-LabanAdam Chapnick, Lyle DickAlvin Finkel,Kiera LadnerJocelyn LétourneauAlain NoëlVeronica Strong-BoagDaniel Weinstock and Reg Whitaker.

Lettres ouvertes disponibles en ligne

Un rapport gênant”, Le Devoir, 20 octobre 2011.

Le rapport complexe des Québécois avec leur histoire”, Le Devoir, 20 octobre 2011.

Le Québec en transition”, La Presse, 12 novembre 2010, p. A

Que faire d’octobre 1970 ?”, Le Devoir, 7 octobre 2010, p. A7.

L’avenir de 1759”, La Presse, 12 septembre 2009, section plus, p. 7.

L’histoire est-elle (dé)passée ?”, Le Devoir, 18/19 octobre 2008, p. G1.

L’histoire à l’ère posthistorique”, Le Devoir, 10 juillet 2008, p. A7.

La raison de Bouchard-Taylor”, Le Devoir, 19 juin 2008, p. A7.

Une loi de la clarté identitaire ?”, Le Devoir, 6 novembre 2007, p. A7.

Élections historiques ?”, Le Devoir, 29 mars 2007, p. A7.

Un débat mal parti”, Le Devoir, 1er mai 2006, p. A7.

Le spectre de la pensée radicale”, Le Devoir, 14 juin 2005, p. A7.

Le Conseil de la souveraineté du Québec n’a pas à s’inquiéter”, Le Devoir, 3 avril 2006, p. A6.

Intellectuels québécois engagés”, Le Devoir, 20 juin 2004, p. A7.

Méprises sur un scandale”, Le Devoir, 12 mai 2004, p. A7.

La tradition libérale malmenée”, Le Devoir, 11 décembre 2003, p. A7.

Intellectuels silencieux ?”, Le Devoir, 24 février 2003, p. A7.

Du Soi et de l’Autre”, Le Devoir, 18 décembre 2002, p. A11.

Trapped by Mistaken Identity”, The Globe & Mail, 5 mars 2001, p. A9.