Archives de Tag: nation

Parution de « S’intégrer à une nation passe-t-il par l’assimilation de son récit historique? Réflexion à partir du cas québécois »

On dit souvent que connaître l’histoire d’une nation aide à s’intégrer à cette nation. Pour cette raison, on estime qu’il y aurait lieu d’enseigner davantage l’histoire du Québec aux jeunes Québécois issus de l’immigration pour favoriser leur intégration à la nation québécoise. Mais sait-on vraiment ce que ces jeunes en particulier savent de l’histoire du Québec ? Le présent article tire profit d’une vaste enquête menée sur le rapport des jeunes Québécois à l’histoire du Québec pour approfondir la question. Fort de leurs trouvailles, les auteurs abordent ensuite directement le problème posé par le titre de leur article : peut- on effectivement soutenir que les jeunes Québécois issus de l’immigration s’intégreraient mieux à la nation québécoise s’ils en connaissaient l’histoire (en admettant qu’ils ne la connaissent pas, ce que ce texte remet en cause)?

Pour lire l’article.

In « Palgrave Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education »

 

Teaching National History to Young People Today

  • Jocelyn Létourneau

Abstract

How to teach the nation without churning out little nationalists? How to bring young people to adopt a critical stance about the(ir) nation while passing national reference points along? How to represent the nation in its dissonances and ambiguities while making sense of what she was and is? Létourneau argues that presenting the nation as an open rather than a closed place, as a reality that can be questioned rather than proof that must be preserved, and as a composite rather than unambiguous historical shape may be a promising path for teaching the transforming nation to a young audience. He maintains that by initiating them to the true and the good and giving them a foothold on the world they, in turn, can build it in their own way.Palgrave_Handbook_of_Research_in_Histori-page-001Palgrave_Handbook_of_Research_in_Histori-page-002

CALL FOR PAPERS: London Review of Education // Young people, national narratives and history education (Deadline: January, 2016)

CALL FOR PAPERS: London Review of Education // Young people, national narratives and history education

The truism that young people know nothing about history has been successfully challenged by research. When surveyed using methodologies that interrogate understanding, rather than those with simplistic quizzes and factual tests, young people often reveal that they know a good deal about the past. Many can build historical narratives that address the past experiences of their culture, society or nation, and demonstrate that they not only know things about the past but are able to organise this knowledge. However, research also reveals that historical narratives crafted by young people, and the knowledge built from them, are structured as much by cultural and national myth‐histories – passed on through interaction with peers, family, culture, schooling and the media – as by formally agreed histories. Their rich historical learning can therefore result in deep historical misunderstanding, leading to the appearance that young people ‘know nothing’.   This special feature in the London Review of Education will explore the multiple sources of young people’s historical knowledge – through collective memory and social conversation as well as in the formal history classroom – and the implications for historical education that young people are not passive assimilators but active builders of historical sense.   We seek papers that examine the relationships between young people, schools, identity and cultural/other histories in national, intranational, international and supranational contexts, in any part of the world. We welcome submissions that adopt empirical and/or theoretical approaches to young people’s knowledge of the past, including studies of young people’s historical consciousness and papers that address the implications, for pedagogical practice, of that fact that young people’s ‘ignorance’ is a complicated matter.   Articles are subject to full peer review. Please send abstracts, outlines and expressions of interest by 31 January 2016 to Dr Arthur Chapman (a.chapman@ioe.ac.uk). The deadline for submission of manuscripts is 30 June 2016. Informal enquiries to the editors about possible paper submissions are welcome and should be addressed to the contact above. Articles in this feature will be published in January 2017.

The truism that young people know nothing about history has been successfully challenged by research. When surveyed using methodologies that interrogate understanding, rather than those with simplistic quizzes and factual tests, young people often reveal that they know a good deal about the past. Many can build historical narratives that address the past experiences of their culture, society or nation, and demonstrate that they not only know things about the past but are able to organise this knowledge. However, research also reveals that historical narratives crafted by young people, and the knowledge built from them, are structured as much
by cultural and national myth‐histories – passed on through interaction with peers, family, culture, schooling and the media – as by formally agreed histories. Their rich historical learning can therefore result in deep historical misunderstanding, leading to the appearance that young people ‘know nothing’.  This special feature in the London Review of Education will explore the multiple sources of young people’s historical knowledge – through collective memory and social conversation as well as in the formal history classroom – and the implications for historical education that young people are not passive assimilators but active builders of historical sense.  
We seek papers that examine the relationships between young people, schools, identity and cultural/other histories in national, intranational, international and supranational contexts, in any part of the world. We welcome submissions that adopt empirical and/or theoretical approaches to young people’s knowledge of the past, including studies of young people’s historical consciousness and papers that address the implications, for pedagogical practice, of that fact that young people’s ‘ignorance’ is a complicated matter.  Articles are subject to full peer review. Please send abstracts, outlines and expressions of interest by 31 January 2016 to Dr Arthur Chapman (a.chapman@ioe.ac.uk). The deadline for submission of manuscripts is 30 June 2016. Informal enquiries to the editors about possible paper submissions are welcome and should be addressed to the contact above. Articles in this feature will be published in January 2017.

Presentations @ London / Sept. 7-9 2015

Jocelyn Létourneau will give two presentations in London shortly. WHEN? September 7-9 2015 WHY? The 12th International Conference of the History Educators International Research Network WHERE? The University of London – Institute of Education WHAT? The titles of the presentations are: Teaching History To K12 Kids: Reflections Based On A Large Scale Research Project Quebec Students and their Historical Consciousness of the Nation

Jocelyn Létourneau will give two presentations in London shortly.
WHEN? September 7-9 2015
WHY? The 12th International Conference of the History Educators International Research Network
WHERE? The University of London – Institute of Education
WHAT? The titles of the presentations are:
Teaching History To K12 Kids: Reflections Based On A Large Scale Research Project
Quebec Students and their Historical Consciousness of the Nation

ABSTRACT : TEACHING HISTORY TO K12 KIDS: REFLECTIONS BASED ON A LARGE SCALE RESEARCH PROJECT

When submitted to trivia tests, kids seem to know very little about the past of their community (nation). I decided to look at the situation a different way in asking two broad questions to about 5000 different young people, during a period of ten years, when they were in the classroom: 1) « Tell me the history of Quebec as you know »; 2) « If you had to summarize the history of Quebec in a phrase, what would you write personally? » Analysing the corpus shows two things: 1) kids know more about the past of their community (nation) than we think they do; 2) what they know is as powerful as it is simplistic. So the question: How to teach history to kids in the context they are not empty pots but have a very strong prior knowledge?

First step is to assess knowledge kids possess… to discover that it’s very much rooted in their community’s mythistories (I shall define that concept in my talk). Second is to create a cognitive conflict with kid’s prior knowledge so they are challenged in their historical representations. Third is to provide kids with alternative historical knowledge structured in the form of “catchy” ideas (so they may remember something of what is taught to them), knowledge also focused on their community’s mythistories (in order to have them distancing from the common premises upon which their culture is constructed, so they study history with a purpose, which is a good inducement to develop their learning interest). o In the paper each point will be detailed and backed with arguments. The aim of the talk is not to go against historical thinking theory but to adjust the basics of this theory with the general context into which kids learn (and use that knowledge to live efficiently in complex social settings).

References:

• J. Létourneau, Je me souviens ? Le passé du Québec dans la conscience historique de sa jeunesse, Montreal, Fides, 2014.

• J. Létourneau, “Teaching National History to Young People Today”, in Mario Carretero, Stefan Berger & Maria Grever (eds.), International Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education. Hybrid Ways of Learning History, London, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. [To be published].

• J. Létourneau, S. Lévesque & R. Gani, “A Giant with Clay Feet: Quebec Students and the Historical Consciousness of the Nation”, International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research, 11, 2 (May 2013), p. 159-175.

Jocelyn Létourneau Heirnet

From @ThenHier September e-Bulletin

* Jocelyn Létourneau will be a Visiting Research Associate at University College London (UCL) Institute of Education this fall, where he will be working principally with Arthur Chapman and Stuart Foster. He will co-edit, with Arthur Chapman, a special issue of the London Review of Education with the theme, “Negotiating the Nation: Young People, National Narratives and History Education.”

@ London June 23rd

Centre for Quebec and French-Canadian Studies (CQFCS) - Study Day Location: King’s College London, Strand, Nash Theatre and River Room (King’s Building, 2nd floor) When: 23 June 2015, 16.00-18.00 (Film screening) 18.30-22.00 (Round Table and Reception What can Quebec, which has spent much of the 20th century agonizing over its own national identity, teach us about “post-national” societies in the wake of the global phenomenon of transnational migration? One of the only states to have appointed a commission of inquiry into the modalities of accommodements raisonnables or “reasonable accommodation” between the host society and increasingly diverse forms of cultural integration, Quebec has had the advantage of reflecting publicly on what ought to be expected of new immigrants and long-standing citizens alike. The conclusions of that commission (chaired by sociologist Gérard Bouchard and philosopher Charles Taylor in 2007) were far from being unanimously accepted. But the space of dialogue that was opened as a result has continued to bear fruit. For this Study Day, the Centre for Quebec and French-Canadian Studies (IMLR, University of London) brings together four eminent Québécois specialists from a variety of backgrounds to continue the conversation: Denis Chouinard, award-winning filmmaker and professor of media studies at l’Université du Québec à Montréal; Emmanuel Kattan, novelist and philosopher, currently heading the British Council in New York; Jocelyn Létourneau, holder of the Canada Research Chair in Contemporary Quebec History at Laval University; and Christian Rioux, Paris correspondent for the Montreal daily, Le Devoir. The event will begin at 4 pm with a screening of Chouinard’s 2001 tale of a family of Algerian immigrants in Montreal, L’Ange de goudron (Tar Angel), winner of Best Canadian Feature as well as the People’s Choice Award at the Montreal World Film Festival. It will be followed at 6.30 pm by a round table discussion, chaired by Craig Moyes, director of the CQFCS, on the subject of “Local selves and global others: Quebec in the age of transnational migration”. A drinks reception will follow at 9.

Centre for Quebec and French-Canadian Studies (CQFCS) – Study Day
Location: King’s College London, Strand, Nash Theatre and River Room (King’s Building, 2nd floor)
When: 23 June 2015, 16.00-18.00 (Film screening) 18.30-22.00 (Round Table and Reception

« What can Quebec, which has spent much of the 20th century agonizing over its own national identity, teach us about “post-national” societies in the wake of the global phenomenon of transnational migration? One of the only states to have appointed a commission of inquiry into the modalities of accommodements raisonnables or “reasonable accommodation” between the host society and increasingly diverse forms of cultural integration, Quebec has had the advantage of reflecting publicly on what ought to be expected of new immigrants and long-standing citizens alike. The conclusions of that commission (chaired by sociologist Gérard Bouchard and philosopher Charles Taylor in 2007) were far from being unanimously accepted. But the space of dialogue that was opened as a result has continued to bear fruit. For this Study Day, the Centre for Quebec and French-Canadian Studies (IMLR, University of London) brings together four eminent Québécois specialists from a variety of backgrounds to continue the conversation: Denis Chouinard, award-winning filmmaker and professor of media studies at l’Université du Québec à Montréal; Emmanuel Kattan, novelist and philosopher, currently heading the British Council in New York; Jocelyn Létourneau, holder of the Canada Research Chair in Contemporary Quebec History at Laval University; and Christian Rioux, Paris correspondent for the Montreal daily, Le Devoir. The event will begin at 4 pm with a screening of Chouinard’s 2001 tale of a family of Algerian immigrants in Montreal, L’Ange de goudron (Tar Angel), winner of Best Canadian Feature as well as the People’s Choice Award at the Montreal World Film Festival. It will be followed at 6.30 pm by a round table discussion, chaired by Craig Moyes, director of the CQFCS, on the subject of “Local selves and global others: Quebec in the age of transnational migration”. A drinks reception will follow at 9. »